Appraisal of: Golder S, Loke YK. Failure or success of electronic search strategies to identify adverse effects data. J Med Libr Assoc 2012;100(2):130-134.

Short description: 
The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adverse effects terms in the title, abstract, and / or indexing of adverse effects papers published from 2001 onwards and the implications of this on search strategy approaches. A cohort of 242 papers, indexed in MEDLINE, Embase and / or Science Citation Index (SCI), was identified to investigate this and compare the results with a similar study published in 2001 by Derry, Loke and Aronson. Of the 242 papers identified, 231 were indexed in MEDLINE, 222 were indexed in Embase and 238 were indexed in SCI. Searching with generic or specific named adverse effects terms in the title, abstract, or indexing identify 89% of the references indexed in Embase, 80% of the references indexed in Medline and 70% of the references indexed in SCI. Generic adverse effects terms in the title and abstract in any of the 3 databases, generic and specific indexing terms or adverse effects subheadings in Embase, and subheadings for adverse effects in Medline retrieved the highest proportion of references. Compared to previous research findings, adverse effects terms seemed to be increasingly prevalent in the title, abstract and indexing of adverse effects papers in both MEDLINE and Embase.
Limitations stated by the author(s): 
No limitations stated by the study authors
Limitations stated by the reviewer(s): 
No limitations detected by the reviewer
Study Type: 
Single study
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